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Why is it a workplace safety issue?

Faculty, staff, and students play the largest role in preventing violence in the workplace. You see what happens daily in your work area or academic setting. While domestic/intimate partner violence seems like a personal issue, it can become a workplace safety issue because the controlling partner knows where and when to find the victim. If the controlling partner comes to Johns Hopkins, faculty, staff, students, patients, and visitors can be at risk for violence.

Coworkers and fellow students often know about incidents of domestic/intimate partner violence and are in the best position to elevate the situation for help because you are trusted.

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Behaviors of Concern Begin
Early Identification of Safety Concerns
Higher Risk for Workplace Violence, Despair, Suicide
Behaviors of Concern

Inappropriate Behaviors

Inappropriate behavior is often seen as the way a person “broadcasts” him or herself. When inappropriate behavior is not managed, one may push the limits and become disruptive. Some specific actions include: making rude, loud, and off-colored remarks, telling degrading jokes, and swearing in public.

Behaviors of Concern

Disrespectful and Rude Behavior

Disrespectful behavior is more hostile than inappropriate behavior and is usually aimed directly at another person. Some specific actions include: criticizing or dismissing achievements, degrading others, and shouting.

Early Identification of Safety Concern

Mild Bullying

Johns Hopkins has defined workplace bullying as repeated mistreatment of a person that may result in harm to one’s health and that takes one or more of the following forms: verbal abuse; offensive conduct/behaviors that are threatening, intimidating, or humiliating; or interference that prevents work from getting done.

Mild bullying includes the behaviors defined above which are aimed directly at another person. Some specific actions are denying access to necessary information, creating isolation, and giving the silent treatment.

Early Identification of Safety Concern

Moderate to Severe Bullying

Johns Hopkins has defined workplace bullying as repeated mistreatment of a person that may result in harm to one’s health and that takes one or more of the following forms: verbal abuse; offensive conduct/behaviors that are threatening, intimidating, or humiliating; or interference that prevents work from getting done.

Moderate to severe bullying includes the behaviors of mild bullying with increased frequency and personalization of mistreatment. Some specific actions are starting gossip campaigns about a person’s character, falsely accusing someone of errors, imposing impossible deadlines, and retaliating for perceived wrongs.

High Risk Behaviors

Stalking

Stalking involves individuals who harass, follow, or give unwanted attention and gifts. Specific actions include: a pattern of repeated unwanted, intrusive, and frightening communication by phone, email, text, or social media.

High Risk Behaviors

Domestic/Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic/intimate partner violence occurs when one partner uses physical violence, intimidation, threats, or emotional, sexual, or economic abuse to control the other partner.  Because the controlling partner can easily locate the victim at work, domestic violence can create a workplace safety concern.

High Risk Behaviors

Stated Threats

Stated threats express an emotional, sexual, psychological, or economic message of future danger. Specific actions include: a direct threat – I’m going to kill you; an indirect threat – I’m going to make sure that you get what you deserve; or a conditional threat – If he fires me, I will kill him.

High Risk Behaviors

Physical Violence

Violence is any action that threatens the safety of employees, residents, students, or patients; impacts their physical or psychological well-being; or causes damage to the institutions’ property.

High Risk Behaviors

Serious Injury and Harm

Serious injury and harm can involve the use of weapons, necessary medical attention, and homicide.